Fixing Web Pages with C.R.A.P
Written by: Ryan Flannagan

Nowadays, aesthetics are one of the most important things in society. Everything is viewed and judged from top to bottom including cars, clothes, houses, and even web pages. In fact, researchers at Carleton University in Ottawa show that first impressions count in website design. If your web page looks too cluttered or complicated, people won’t bother with it. Employing a few simple tips and tricks can lead to a more well polished, professional looking web page. Think about the acronym C.R.A.P; Contrast, Repetition, Alignment, and Proximity.

In this web post, I will cover contrast. The other three terms will appear in future blogs, so keep your eyes open for them!

 

Contrast

Would you like to see an example of proper contrast for a web page? Congratulations, you’re reading it. The best form of contrast for a professional web page is black text on a white background. The black font jumps off of the white background and catches the reader’s eye, yet it is simple enough to read without any difficulty.  If that seems too boring for you, you can also apply a white font to a black background. The reader’s eyes will still be able to read the web page with ease; however, the visual effect will be more dramatic.

Contrast doesn’t have to remain solely in colors; it can also be incorporated in styles of text. For example, different styles of font can really make a header come to life. Would it be easier to catch a readers attention with a title such as “Notice Me,” or “Notice Me?” Definitely the second option. Bold and italics are also good for setting a different contrast to your site. Although messing around with different styles and sizes of font can be fun, use it sparingly. Too much ‘style’can make your web page seem out of control and unappealing to the reader.

In order to get a better understanding of contrast, I suggest taking a close look at magazine covers, billboards, professionally done web pages, and other sources of advertisement just to get a few ideas of how font, colors, and other factors play a role in the aesthetic appeal of the product.

Please stay tuned for my next blog covering repetition!

Would you like to see an example of proper contrast for a web page? Congratulations, you’re reading it. The best form of contrast for a professional web page is black text on a white background. The black font jumps off of the white background and catches the reader’s eye, yet it is simple enough to read without any difficulty.  If that seems too boring for you, you can also apply a white font to a black background. The reader’s eyes will still be able to read the web page with ease; however, the visual effect will be more dramatic.

Contrast doesn’t have to remain solely in colors; it can also be incorporated in styles of text. For example, different styles of font can really make a header come to life. Would it be easier to catch a readers attention with a title such as “Notice Me,” or “Notice Me?” Definitely the second option. Bold and italics are also good for setting a different contrast to your site. Although messing around with different styles and sizes of font can be fun, use it sparingly. Too much ‘style’can make your web page seem out of control and unappealing to the reader.

In order to get a better understanding of contrast, I suggest taking a close look at magazine covers, billboards, professionally done web pages, and other sources of advertisement just to get a few ideas of how font, colors, and other factors play a role in the aesthetic appeal of the product.

Please stay tuned for my next blog covering repetition!

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